Canadian aircraft detected 'underwater noises’ from search area for missing Titanic tourist submarine

A Canadian aircraft deployed to assist with rescue efforts for the missing Titanic tourist submersible picked up “underwater noises” in the vessel’s search area, according to the Coast Guard (USCG).

“Canadian P-3 aircraft detected underwater noises in the search area,” the USCG in the Northeast region announced on Twitter early Wednesday morning.

The Coast Guard said the detection of the underwater sounds in the designated search area prompted investigators to deploy remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to relocate and investigate the origin of the unusual noises.

Though the search efforts “yielded negative results,” the USCG said the operation continues.

ONE OF PAKISTAN’S RICHEST MEN, SON, ABOARD MISSING OCEANGATE TITANIC TOURIST SUBMARINE

OceanGate tourist submersible

Search and rescue operations continue by US Coast Guard in Boston after a tourist submarine bound for the Titanic’s wreckage site went missing off the southeastern coast of Canada. (Ocean Gate / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The branch stated that data has been shared with experts in the U.S. Navy for “further analysis” that will be considered in future search plans.

As of Tuesday morning, over 10,000 square miles had been searched in efforts to find the 21-foot submersible, the Coast Guard reported, but the vessel has not been detected since it disappeared on Sunday. 

The sub, which is carrying five people, was in the process of diving approximately 12,500 feet underwater to view the Titanic’s wreckage site.

OceanGate tourist submersible

The 21-foot submersible had five people on board when it lost contact with Canadian research vessel Polar Prince approximately an hour and 45 minutes into its dive to view the Titanic wreckage site. (Ocean Gate / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

OCEANGATE, COMPANY BEHIND MISSING TITANIC TOURIST SUB, ONCE SUBJECT OF LAWSUIT OVER SAFETY COMPLAINTS

First Coast Guard District Response Coordinator Capt. Jamie Frederick said multiple agencies with expertise and special equipment are participating in the “complex” search effort.

“While the Coast Guard has assumed the role of Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator, we do not have all of the necessary expertise and equipment required in a search of this nature,” Frederick said. “The Unified Command brings that expertise and additional capability together to maximize effort in solving this complex problem.”

US Coast Guard Captain Jamie Frederick

US Coast Guard Captain Jamie Frederick discusses “complex” search efforts for the submersible that went missing during a deep dive to view the Titantic’s wreckage site. (JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

Earlier on Tuesday after a press briefing, Chief Petty Officer Robert Simpson declined reports of an alleged tapping or banging noise coming from the vessel, adding that crews have not heard “any sounds from the sub.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The submersible, which was only equipped with a 96-hour oxygen supply, began its dive at 8 a.m. on Sunday and was expected to resurface at 3 p.m. The Coast Guard said it received a report at 5:40 p.m. from Canadian research vessel Polar Prince alerting that the sub was overdue for its return. 

The Polar Prince also reported that it lost contact with the sub approximately one hour and 45 minutes into its dive.

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »